Igor Kasyanyuk a Harlem High School Student Won Our Button Design Contest for Rock’n for the Red

March 31, 2008

Igor Kasyanyuk, a Harlem High School Student, won our button design contest for Rock’n for the Red. He was awarded a brand new laptop donated by American TV & Appliance. See video footage, a picture and the winning design below.

Tony & Igor
Tony Gasparini & Igor

This button will be used for admission, just $5 and 100% goes directly back into the Rock River community, to Rock’n for the Red Just 21, 2008 at Davis Park in Rockford, Illinois.
Featuring:


Rock’n for the RED a music festival to benefit the Red Cross – Rock’n mini-movie

March 31, 2008

Thanks to Thomas S. Ciciura and Prairie Soul Studios for donating their time and expertise to get this momentous project done. Tom has worked with and been mentored by Steven Spielberg, Robert Richardson, Mel Gibson, George Clooney, Steven Soderbergh, Michael Mann, and Robert Altman to just name a few.

Tom took our idea from a brainstorming session, a storyboard, and script and made it real.

Thanks to all of the actors and volunteers involved it wouldn’t of been possible without you. Watch it below.




Culver’s Check Presentation to American Red Cross – Rock River Chapter

March 27, 2008

Below is some footage from the check presentation and a couple of speeches from the local Culver’s owners. We raised over $5,000 locally and over $180,000 with all the Culver’s combined.

Thanks to all who helped out!


Buy your Icehog tickets to Support the American Red Cross TODAY! (before it sells out!!)

March 21, 2008

March is Red Cross MonthIcehogs logo
In celebration of March as American Red Cross month, the Rockford IceHogs are teaming up with the Rock River Chapter to raise funds for Rock River Valley-area disaster victims.

The IceHogs are hosting an American Red Cross night against the Chicago Wolves at 7:30 p.m. on Friday, March 28. To help support this cause, you can purchase tickets by clicking this link – we get $4 for each ticket sold (make sure you use the link)!

The money will help provide disaster victims with personal care items, emergency shelter, case management and supportive services.

YOU CAN BUY TICKETS UP UNTIL MARCH 28th!! Click this link to buy online (buy your tickets now because they’re predicting a sell-out).

I hope to see you there! If you attend you will also get to see who wins the brand new laptop for our button design contest as well and our brand new Rock’n for the Red commercial.


Myths and Legends about the American Red Cross

March 20, 2008

Clara Barton

If you were 126 years old, chances are there would be a lot of stories about you—and some of them wouldn’t be true! Here are some of the most common myths and legends about the American Red Cross and the services we provide.

Government

Patriotism

The American Red Cross is unpatriotic.

That would be a surprise to the president of the United States, who serves as our honorary chairman!

Like the other Red Cross and Red Crescent societies all over the world, the American Red Cross is required to be neutral. To maintain the confidence of everyone who may need our assistance, we cannot take sides in hostilities or engage at any time in controversies of a political, racial, religious or ideological nature.

From time to time, decisions made in an effort to avoid controversies are in themselves controversial—for example, one chapter received criticism for asking that a choral group avoid religious or patriotic musical selections in its performance. Such missteps are the exception.

Ties to U.S. Government

The American Red Cross is an agency of the U.S. government.

The Red Cross is not a government agency. We are a nonprofit humanitarian organization that relies on voluntary contributions—of time, money, and blood—to do our work. The confusion about our status probably arises from the fact that the American Red Cross is chartered by the U.S. Congress to perform certain functions, such as responding to the needs of disaster victims, that are performed solely by the government in many countries.

Among the fundamental principles under which all Red Cross and Red Crescent societies operate are independence, neutrality and impartiality. These principles require that we maintain our autonomy, refrain from political controversy, and provide assistance based on need, without regard to nationality, race, religious beliefs, class or political opinions.

Military Services

Coffee and Donuts

The Red Cross sold coffee and donuts instead of giving them away to military personnel during World War II.

This unfortunate policy came into being because service agencies in Britain helping British military personnel were less well-financed than the American Red Cross. Thus, these agencies were forced to charge British military members for the same items that American service members were getting free from the American Red Cross.

To avoid further embarrassment to the British, who were playing host to thousands of U.S. troops, the U.S. Secretary of War requested that the American Red Cross begin charging American service members for such items as coffee and donuts in its canteens. The Red Cross interpreted this request as a wartime demand and complied so that it could continue aiding U.S. troops. However, the Red Cross sold items at or below cost and never profited a penny from these sales.

Since the end of World War II, the American Red Cross has not charged military personnel—not in the Korean, Vietnam, or Persian Gulf conflicts, for example.

Blood Services

Cost Recovery

The Red Cross shouldn’t charge money for blood given by donors.

A lot of things must happen to your donated blood before it can be given to a patient who needs it. The Red Cross must collect, test, process, store and transport the blood to area hospitals and transfusion centers. Each unit must be tracked carefully along the way. There are significant costs associated with each of these processes, and we must charge hospitals to recover these costs.

Discrimination

Red Cross blood donation policies discriminate against gay people.

It’s important to understand that blood safety is a public health issue, not a social policy issue. The Red Cross is required by law to follow all Food and Drug Administration (FDA) guidelines and recommendations for the blood industry, including the current deferral of men who have had sex with other men. Along with other members of the blood banking industry, the Red Cross supports a data-based reconsideration of deferral criteria. Read more about blood donor eligibility.

Charles Drew bled to death because a hospital refused to give him a blood transfusion because he was an African American.

This myth has persisted for more than half a century despite efforts by eyewitnesses and Drew family members to set the record straight.

Dr. Drew, the first medical director of the first American Red Cross blood bank and a pioneer in the field of blood plasma preservation and storage, died of injuries sustained in a car accident in 1950. He was taken to Alamance Hospital in North Carolina, where he was treated by three surgeons for an hour and a half before being declared dead. He was not denied treatment or blood transfusions because of his race.

To this day, the American Red Cross continues to celebrate Dr. Drew’s legacy of achievement. The Charles Drew Institute, named in his honor, is the centerpiece of the Red Cross biomedical training system.

Safety

If I donate blood, I could get a disease.

HIV and other transmissible diseases cannot be contracted through blood donations. A sterile needle is used for each donation and discarded after one use.

If I receive a blood transfusion, I’ll get a disease.

The top priority of the American Red Cross is to provide the safest possible blood supply for patients who need blood. There are multiple layers of safety that help protect the blood supply, which include self-deferrals, completion of the blood donation record, health history screening, testing, and post donation information.

Tests for infectious diseases such as hepatitis B, syphilis, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1 and HIV-2), human T-lymphotropic virus (HTLV-I and -II), the hepatitis C virus (HCV), West Nile Virus and Chagas’ disease are conducted on each unit of donated blood. The Red Cross also utilizes a technology called nucleic acid testing (NAT) that can detect genetic material of hepatitis C and HIV more quickly and more accurately. In addition, the American Red Cross has the capability to filter red blood cells to reduce leukocytes, or white blood cells, which can cause transfusion complications in patients with weakened immune systems.

September 11

After 9/11, the Red Cross collected so much blood that it had to throw much of it out.

Blood is a perishable commodity, with a shelf life of about 42 days. Typically, between 1 percent and 3 percent of units collected reach their expiration date before they are used. That rate was only slightly higher (5 percent) for blood units collected from people anxious to help after 9/11, including more than a quarter-million people who gave blood for the first time.

In the uncertain days following the terrorist attacks, having a robust supply of blood available seemed prudent. It takes two to three days for blood to be collected, tested and processed, and only blood already on the shelf can be used in the immediate aftermath of an emergency.

Cost Recovery

Blood

The Red Cross shouldn’t charge money for blood given by donors.

A lot of things must happen to your donated blood before it can be given to a patient who needs it. The Red Cross must collect, test, process, store and transport the blood to area hospitals and transfusion centers. Each unit must be tracked carefully along the way. There are significant costs associated with each of these processes, and we must charge hospitals to recover these costs.

Disasters

The Red Cross charges people for services they receive during disasters.

All Red Cross disaster assistance is free, regardless of the type of assistance (sheltering, food, clothing, mental health counseling, etc.) or the size of the disaster. The American Red Cross responds to more than 70,000 disasters every year, and most of them are house fires. Read more about what you can expect from the Red Cross in a disaster.

Disaster Services

Hurricane Katrina

The American Red Cross should have sent its helicopters and boats to help rescue victims of Hurricane Katrina.

The American Red Cross doesn’t have helicopters or boats and does not conduct or participate in search-and-rescue operations. Our job during disasters is to take care of people by offering food, clothing, shelter and comfort, and most of this work is performed by volunteers. Rescues must be conducted by trained emergency personnel. Read more about what you can expect from the Red Cross in a disaster.

The American Red Cross refused to help the people of New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina.

In any hurricane evacuation, the job of the Red Cross is to care for victims in buildings that are safe from winds and water. When government officials ordered the evacuation of New Orleans, the Red Cross followed that evacuation order and provided shelter to evacuees in safe locations throughout Louisiana and other states. Planning with state and local officials for many years had shown that there were no safe shelter locations within the city of New Orleans.

We were prepared to re-enter New Orleans to provide relief services, but the Louisiana Office of Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness asked that we not send people and vehicles into the city because of their concerns that doing so would disrupt rescue efforts and impede further evacuation efforts. The responsibility for caring for those remaining in New Orleans was assigned to first responders and the National Guard, not the Red Cross. The American Red Cross is not a “first responder” and plays no role in rescue or evacuation.

As soon as evacuees were allowed to return to New Orleans, the Red Cross immediately set up feeding sites, mobile feeding routes and bulk distribution sites in the city. The Red Cross also continued to provide food and shelter and meet other disaster-caused emergency needs of those who could not return home. Read more about our response to the 2005 hurricanes.

September 11

The Red Cross misused money contributed after 9/11.

False. All contributions have been used exclusively to meet the immediate and long-term needs of people directly affected by the September 11 tragedies. Read more about the ways the Red Cross is helping those affected by the tragedies of September 11.

In the aftermath of the terrorist attacks, the then-president of the American Red Cross proposed spending some of the donated funds to prepare for future disasters. When that proposal proved very unpopular, it was abandoned. The Red Cross has since instituted a number of changes to make sure donors are aware of how their contributions will be spent and when the Red Cross has enough contributions to pay for its response to a particular disaster.

Fundraising

Dixie Chicks

The Red Cross turned down a million-dollar donation from the Dixie Chicks.

Untrue. In 2003, following a political controversy that erupted on a London stage during a live performance, the Dixie Chicks’ management approached the American Red Cross and inquired about a promotional partnership for their forthcoming tour. There was no offer for an unrestricted donation to the Red Cross; rather, the “offer” was actually a business proposal.

Prior to the controversy, the Chicks’ management ignored two successive invitations to join the Red Cross National Celebrity Cabinet. Should the Dixie Chicks ever decide to make an unconditional financial donation to the American Red Cross, we would gladly accept it and put it to work toward our lifesaving mission.

September 11

The Red Cross misused money contributed after 9/11.

False. All contributions have been used exclusively to meet the immediate and long-term needs of people directly affected by the September 11 tragedies. Read more about the ways the Red Cross is helping those affected by the tragedies of September 11.

In the aftermath of the terrorist attacks, the then-president of the American Red Cross proposed spending some of the donated funds to prepare for future disasters. When that proposal proved very unpopular, it was abandoned. The Red Cross has since instituted a number of changes to make sure donors are aware of how their contributions will be spent and when the Red Cross has enough contributions to pay for its response to a particular disaster.

International Services

Guantanamo Prison Visits

Guantanamo detainee visits mean the American Red Cross is anti-American.

The American Red Cross is definitely not anti-American, and it doesn’t visit detainees or prisoners of war, either. Those visits are the unique responsibility of the Switzerland-based International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC), a neutral, independent organization whose humanitarian mission is to protect the lives and dignity of victims of war and internal violence.

The Geneva Conventions require that all detainees or prisoners of war, without regard to nationality, be visited by the ICRC to help assure the world that their treatment is humane. The ICRC visits almost a half-million detainees and POWs in about 2,000 locations around the world each year. Learn more about the role of the ICRC and the other organizations that make up the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement.


Jessica & Rahil talk about CPR, First Aid, AED, and Pet CPR at the Red Cross

March 19, 2008

Watch Jessica and Rahil on WTVO’s Daybreak! Click the link below.

Jess & Rahil on WTVO

CLICK HERE TO WATCH

Don’t forget to buy your Icehog tickets to support the Red Cross each ticket sold through this link mean we get $4 from each ticket sold!


Buy your Icehog tickets to Support the American Red Cross – Rock River Chapter!!

March 14, 2008

March is Red Cross MonthIcehogs logo
In celebration of March as American Red Cross month, the Rockford IceHogs are teaming up with the Rock River Chapter to raise funds for Rock River Valley-area disaster victims.

The IceHogs are hosting an American Red Cross night against the Chicago Wolves at 7:30 p.m. on Friday, March 28. To help support this cause, you can purchase tickets by clicking this link – we get $4 for each ticket sold!

The money will help provide disaster victims with personal care items, emergency shelter, case management and supportive services. For the special Red Cross promotional rate to apply, you must purchase tickets by March 17

YOU CAN BUY TICKETS UP UNTIL MARCH 28th!! Click this link to buy online.

I hope to see you there! If you attend you will also get to see who wins the brand new laptop for our button design contest as well and our brand new Rock’n for the Red commercial.